Miami's second women's residence hall, constructed in 1911-12, was named after Miami's first President Robert Hamilton Bishop, but had neither a cornerstone nor dedication ceremony. Until 1923 portions of Bishop Hall were also used as a hospital, with the whole building used for this purpose during the influenza epidemic of 1918. The building currently houses the University Honors Program and serves as a residence hall for Honors students.

Sources:
Flinterman, Miami Buildings, Past and Present , 1966, LD3241.M534 F54x

Glos, Biographies of the Men and Women For Whom Miami Buildings are Named, 1983, LD3241.M534 G56 1983x

Irwin, "Miami University Facilities"


Robert Hamilton Bishop was born in the parish of Whittburn, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, on July 26, 1777. He received his A.B. and D.D. degrees from the University of Edinburgh and was subsequently licensed as a Presbyterian minister. In September 1802, Bishop came to America and, the following year, became a professor at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky. In 1824 Bishop became the first President of Miami University, serving as well as Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy and History.
During his tenure, President Bishop was especially beloved by the students and an 1869 Miami Student article recalled that "the fatherly interest he took in his pupils, could not fail to win the esteem and confidence of all, and in fact secured the love and veneration of most of them. " In addition to his work at Miami, Bishop also assisted in reorganizing the Presbyterian church. During the latter portion of his presidency, Bishop was often at odds with the Trustees, Faculty, and public over theological and political issues, and especially over what some Trustees considered to be the lamentable lack of student discipline at Miami. In 1841 Bishop resigned the presidency under fire from Board members, but stayed on as professor of history and political science at a greatly reduced salary.
Controversy and disorder continued at Miami under the new President George Junkin and, in 1844, Junkin's resignation was quickly followed by the removal of Bishop and his close friend John Witherspoon Scott from the faculty, Bishop and Scott moved on to Farmer's College in Cincinnati, where Bishop died on April 29, 1855. Bishop and his wife were buried on the grounds of the College. On June 20, 1959, when the burial site was to be excavated for the construction of a new high school, they were reburied in a grave near the formal gardens of Miami University.

Sources:
Glos, Biographies of the Men and Women For Whom Miami Buildings are Named, 1983, LD3241.M534 G56 1983x

Havighurst, The Miami Years, 1984, LD3241.M52 H3 1984

Miami Student, 24 November 1869


April 1998